Welcome to the homeBBBrew board!
Like the BBB, the homeBBBrew board is not a club, just a place to talk about making beer. Is there a swap you would like to see happen? If we can find a few others who have something similar then lets do it!

NO SPECIFIC REASON FOR THIS LINK...
I just really like the work levifunk is doing!

PASSWORD PROTECTION: READ THIS BEFORE POSTING!
YOUR BBB USERNAME AND PASSWORD WILL NOT WORK ON THIS BOARD! If you want to post, you need to read this.

HomeBBBrewBoard
HotLinks!
Brettanomyces Brewing
E-Symposium Transcript!

Trouble making Trappists?
Discover Liquid Candy Syrup!
See what color impact to expect from liquid candy.

Search for:
Author Replies
Jeff "TruthBrew"
08/21/05 10:16 AM  
Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
I brewed a Witbier yesterday (a bit over 11 gallons, 1044 OG with 1.5oz Bitter Orange Peel @ 15 min, 2oz Sweet Orange Peel @ 5 min, and 1oz Corriander @ 5 min).

During the formulation of the recipe and the research I did, I found that the level of spicing people recommend are all over the place.

- What are your experiences with spicing?

- Do you vary your spicing levels based on the recipes expected OG?

- When too much of a certain spice is added, what negatives flavors or characteristics to you notice? (I've read 'bubble-gum hotdogs' as a witbier description)

- What resources have you found that talk about spicing?

- Anything else?

SteveG
08/21/05 06:58 PM  
Re: Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
>>- What are your experiences with spicing?

- Do you vary your spicing levels based on the recipes expected OG?<<

I'm sure this varies from spice to spice, but in general I find they fade, or maybe blend. I guess at some point they would probably be in your face and stay in your face, but lighter handed spicing can disapate. My advice to people who like obvious spicing would be to think more along the lines of when I'm going to serve it than OG. If somebody wanted to make a wit with a sustained corriander level and they were not going to drink it sooner I think they might benefit from going heavier.

>>- When too much of a certain spice is added, what negatives flavors or characteristics to you notice? (I've read 'bubble-gum hotdogs' as a witbier description)<<

To my great regret I hate the taste of sweet gale! Using it seemed a natural. To me it tastes like fennel sausage.

>>- What resources have you found that talk about spicing?<<

Thats a tough question, for my personal tastes most brewers who spice go way over the top. I like spicing that impacts the flavor a little without driving it. Ommegang is a great example, I believe few brewers think as they do, so I find most resources are not for me.

>>- Anything else?<<

Its coming up on pumpkin ale season. Hopfully I'm not the only one out there that appreciates that pumpkin is not the same thing as pumpkin pie. Does anyone else make it without allspice?

Al B.
08/22/05 11:51 AM  
Re: Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
Penzey's spices (mailorder) are by far, the freshest and most fragrant spices I've ever encountered. I use them for cooking everything.

I used about 1 tsp. of Penzey's Corriander seed for a Saison. I'll need to wait next year for it to fade. Very much in your face.

A negative flavor for too much corriander - if old - might be "vegetal" whatever that's like.

Jeff "TruthBrew"
08/22/05 12:29 PM  
Penzy's Corriander
I used Penzy's Corriander and Sweet Orange Peel (they only have one type of orange peel). Thankfully, after reviewing my records, I only used 0.5oz in 11 gallons (as opposed to my listed 1oz), so I don't think that will be over the top.

Right now my fermentation is going nuts (about 77F, but trying to keep it a bit cooler) and for better or worse it smells a bit like Trix cereal (my guess is that is the sweet orange peel). Can't wait for it to get done.

Al B.
08/22/05 01:16 PM  
Re: Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
My next Saison du Spelt, I'm thinking of going with some lemon peel and grains of paradise.

Anyone use any dried woodruff lately? Chamomile? Hawthorn berries?

Mark A
09/12/05 06:18 PM  
Re: Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
The Trix cereal smell is without a doubt the coriander, not the orange peel. I first noticed this when visiting a professional brewery that was in the process of making a witbier. Once you start thinking about Trix, it's really hard to get that out of your head.
Scott Jackson
09/13/05 01:37 PM  
Re: Spicing beers. What are your experiences?
I usually go pretty light and normally only spice my Saisons, Wits, and Grand Cru (basically a double Wit). However, since Steve did mention pumpkin beer I will tell you about my experiment last year which I will repeat this year.

I normally brew a pumpkin beer every year towards the end of September (around by birthday) to have ready for Thanksgiving. It is normally around 1.060 - 1.070 OG with canned pumpkin in the mash, and honey and maple syrup in the boil. The most consistent spicing I have gotten comes from using McKormick's pumpkin pie spice. I put a tablespoon (for 10 gallons) in at the end of the boil, then I add another teaspoon when racking into secondary and maybe another when kegging if it is not spicy enough.

The experiment last year was to take half of the wort (5 gallons) and ferment it with White Labs Saison yeast instead of the nromal English ale yeast that I used. I did not add the additional spice in the secondary and the keg.

I must say I was quite impressed with the results and plan to repeat the experiment this year. The beer had underlying pumpkin pie spice, but the Saison character was definately theer as well.

 
Return to Forum

Post a Reply
Your Name:
Subject:
Message Body:


 
   
Username

Password

Around Bruges in 80 Beers: 2nd Edition

Around London in 80 Beers

Around Brussels in 80 Beers


Babblebelt contributors in attendance: