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Like the BBB, the homeBBBrew board is not a club, just a place to talk about making beer. Is there a swap you would like to see happen? If we can find a few others who have something similar then lets do it!

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I just really like the work levifunk is doing!

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MikeM
11/28/06 07:23 PM  
'Rejuvenating' Yeast?

<<You ask whether slurry can be repitched indefinitely. After any fermentation, especially a tough high gravity one, the yeast will be depleted of "material" (i.e. fatty acids and sterols that make up the cell membrane).>>

I wanted to start a new thread regarding this subject. If slurry wears out/mutated after repeated use, how does one maintain viable yeast cells for years and years?

Is it possible to take cells from a slurry and reculture in a lab (or with lab equipment) with the proper nutrients, to rejuvenate partially spent cells?

MikeM

SteveG
11/29/06 07:42 AM  
Re: 'Rejuvenating' Yeast?
>>I wanted to start a new thread regarding this subject. If slurry wears out/mutated after repeated use, how does one maintain viable yeast cells for years and years?<<

Why did you want to start a new thread? If you're a homebrewer you buy new yeast. If you're a lab you keep samples frozen in nitrogen freezers.

>>Is it possible to take cells from a slurry and reculture in a lab (or with lab equipment) with the proper nutrients, to rejuvenate partially spent cells?<<

Sure, as long as spent does not mean dead. Actually I think you don't really need a lab, Al does some great work right in his basement.

N8
11/29/06 11:08 AM  
Re: 'Rejuvenating' Yeast?
It's pretty easy to seperate healthy, unstressed cells with a simple microscope at home.

A little bit of practice and know-how and you can keep a strain going for a pretty good amount of time.

Al B
12/01/06 09:25 AM  
Re: 'Rejuvenating' Yeast?
Its certaintly alot easier to buy new yeast, unless you have a unique strain you wish to keep. In which case, the stressed cells will benefit from constant oxygen with a stir plate for example, fresh media at a low gravity, and proper yeast nutrients.

I wouldn't be to concerned with mutations, but infection of your working culture (in that case its good practice to have a back-up stock culture in the refridge).

Al Bunson-burner

 
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